briefs

New Legislation: Repeat Courses

Legislative Services has spent the summer of 2019 writing briefs on the new legislation that was passed at the 2019 convention. You can find all of the changes in one spot here.

Our first three briefs were on the significant changes to the financial aid bylaw and you can find all three parts here: Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3. We’ve also talked about the exciting mid-year eligibility opportunity which you can read here! In our last brief we discussed the Class Rank exception that will be going into effect on May 1, 2020.

This week we are going to address the changes to Article V, Section C, Item 12, and the adjustments made to the repeat course rule. The entire change is below!

 

 

Repeat Course Rule (Article V, Section C, Item 12)

 

12. A repeat course previously passed with a grade of “D” or better in any term, summer or non-term, and subsequently retaken.

 

For the purposes of this rule, the NAIA does not recognize a +/- attached to a letter grade. Consequently, a B+, B, and B- shall count as a B, a C+, C, and C- shall count as a C and D+, D, and D- shall count as a D.

 

Repeat courses previously passed with a grade of “D” in the initial attempt and retaken, earning a grade of “C” or better, shall be considered toward satisfying the 24/36-Hour Rule.

 

Repeat courses previously passed with a grade of “D” in the initial attempt and retaken, earning a grade of “D”, shall be excluded and cannot be considered towards satisfaction of the 24/36-Hour Rule. Only the initial attempt shall be considered toward satisfying the 24/36-Hour Rule.

 

A maximum of one repeat course per term previously passed with a grade of “D” (or the equivalent) may be counted toward satisfying the 12-Hour Enrollment Rule.

 

Repeat courses previously passed with a grade of “C” or better cannot be applied to meet either the 12-Hour Enrollment Rule or the 24/36-Hour Rule.

 

EXCEPTION: If at the time of certification, a student’s declared major field of study at the NAIA institution requires a grade of “B” or higher for a specific course required for degree completion, repeat courses previously passed with a grade lower than a “B” can be applied to meet the 12-Hour Enrollment Rule and the 24/36-Hour Rule.

 

A maximum of one repeat course per term previously passed with a grade of “C” or “D” (or the equivalent) may be counted toward satisfying the 12-Hour Enrollment Rule.

 

NOTE: This rule applies to all student-athletes’ coursework certification beginning with the 2016-20172019-2020 academic year, regardless of when the coursework was completed.

 

Article V, Section C, Item 12

This bylaw amendment was submitted by the Heart of America Athletic Conference and was co-sponsored by the Registrars Association. The intent behind this amendment and exception is to allow a student to repeat a course and use it for eligibility when the student’s degree demands a grade of “B” or higher. What our membership saw on campus was students being punished by being in more rigorous degree program that demanded a higher passing grade. The gist of this bylaw is the same, with this added exception.

The bylaw went into effect on May 1, 2019, and thus will only apply to courses taken or repeated after that date.

Case Studies

*Assume all schools are NAIA institutions unless otherwise noted.

*Assume all classes are three institutional credit hours unless otherwise noted.

Scenario 1:

Marlo is repeating two courses in the fall of 2019, in Class 1 he previously earned a “D” and in Class 2 he previously earned a “C.” Class C is in Marlo’s major area of study and in order for the course to count towards his degree, he must get a “B” or better. Marlo is enrolled in 12 institutional credit hours including these two repeat courses. If Marlo wants to compete in the fall of 2019, will he meet the 12-hour enrollment rule?

Answer 1:

NO! Marlo (and all NAIA athletes) can only use one repeat course a term to help them meet the 12-hour enrollment rule. In this scenario, it does not matter that Marlo has two different versions of repeat courses. The last line of the exception clearly states that only one repeat course a term can be used towards satisfying the 12-hour enrollment rule!

Scenario 2 (continuation of Scenario 1):

What if Marlo was enrolled in 15 institutional credit hours in the fall of 2019 including these two repeat courses, would he meet the 12-hour enrollment rule so that he can compete?

Answer 2:

Yes! Marlo is not prohibited from taking more than one repeat course in a term, but he is prohibited from using more than one repeat course to help him meet the 12-hour enrollment rule. One of his repeat classes would be considered towards the 12-hour enrollment rule, but the other one would not.

Scenario 3:

Omar is transferring to your NAIA institution from Wire College. Omar is going to major in chemistry at your school, a change from Wire College where he was a business major. Omar is coming to your school for the fall of 2019 and your academic advisor tells him that he needs to repeat a biology course that he took at Wire College and earned a “C” because the chemistry major requires a grade of “B” or better in the class in order to be applied towards the degree. Omar’s previous major at Wire College only required that he earn a “C” or better. Can Omar repeat this course at his current NAIA institution and use it towards the 12-hour enrollment rule?

Answer 3:

Yes! Because the certifying NAIA institution’s chemistry degree requires a grade of “B” or better, then Omar can repeat the course and use it towards the 12-hour enrollment rule. It is the major at the certifying NAIA institution that governs this rule.

Scenario 4:

Stringer enrolls as a freshman in Block College (BC) in the fall of 2017 and does not declare a major. In that term, he takes and passes a poetry class with a grade of “D.” It is now the fall of 2019, and Stringer chooses journalism to be his major. The journalism degree requires a grade of “B” or better in all core courses including the poetry class where Stringer earned a “D.” Can Stringer repeat this course two years later and use it to meet the 12-hour enrollment rule? Does it matter that he didn’t declare journalism as his major in 2017?

Answer 4:

Stringer can repeat the poetry class and use it to help him meet the 12-hour enrollment rule. It does not matter that it was two years ago and it does not matter that he did not have a major at the time he originally took the class. The rule applies to any repeat class taken after the bylaw’s enactment regardless of when the first class was taken. Also, it is the major at the time of certification that determines if a student can utilize this exception.

 

Please join Legislative Services at noon central on Tuesday for Facebook live, where Legislative Services will discuss this topic in more detail.

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